Tuesday 16th Oct 2018

A man collects water from an outlet pipe in Newlands, Cape Town where a severe drought has gripped the city. Picture: Courtney Africa/ANA -

The continued decline in agricultural water usage, along with Capetonians doing their bit to cut their water use, has seen the city push back Day Zero to June 4.

“Over the past week, consumption has been lowered to 526 million litres per day. This is the first time that the weekly average usage has remained under 550 million litres due to the City’s pressure management interventions and the efforts by our residents to use as little water as possible,” said Deputy Mayor Ian Neilson.

He said dam levels were at only 24.9% compared to 36.1% last year and 43.3% in 2016. A year ago, the average water demand was 830 million litres per day and the weekly change in dam levels was 1.9%.

“Though the dam levels are much lower than a year ago, we have more information and more control over the system that supplies water to the city. Our continued interactions with the National Department of Water and Sanitation have led to much improved data-sharing and analysis, allowing for more reliable modelling and dramatically improved control over dam levels,” he said.

Two years ago water usage was more than one billion litres per day, resulting in a weekly change of 2.1%.

“If our dam levels were currently dropping at this rate we would reach Day Zero before the end of March. Our dam levels declined by 0,6% over the past week,” he said.

The City will continue to implement pressure management to reduce usage, to install water management devices at the properties of high users and to conduct blitzes to ensure that all water users adhere to the water restrictions.

“Over the past week, consumption has been lowered to 526 million litres per day. This is the first time that the weekly average usage has remained under 550 million litres due to the City’s pressure management interventions and the efforts by our residents to use as little water as possible,” said Neilson.

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